Palm Sunday

The Son of David comes in gentle humility, “sitting on a donkey’s colt,” yet as the King of Israel “in the name of the Lord” (John 12:13–15). He comes to be lifted up in glory on the cross in order to cast out “the ruler of this world” and draw all people to Himself (John 12:23–32).

Annunciation of our Lord

The Annunciation commemorates the visit of the angel Gabriel to the blessed Virgin Mary, announcing that the eternal Son of God would take up human flesh in her womb and, in accordance with Isaiah’s prophecy, be born of a virgin.

Holy (Maundy) Thursday

As disciples of Jesus, we recline at the table with Him to eat and drink in peace (Mark 14:18). In Him, we see “the God of Israel” (Ex. 24:10), and yet He does not lay His hand on us to punish us.

Good Friday

Good Friday calls for sober reflection on the cost of our redemption. Jesus, the Lamb of God, is led to the slaughter of His cross as the Sacrifice of Atonement for the sin of the world.

Easter

By the shed blood of Christ, eternal death has passed over us, and now we pass with Christ through death into life everlasting. For Christ the crucified One is risen!

The Ascension of our Lord

On the fortieth day after His resurrection, our Lord ascended to the right hand of the Father. But although Jesus is hidden from your eyes, He is not absent from you. For He now fills all things in heaven and on earth.

Pentecost

The word “Pentecost” comes from the Greek word pentekostos which means “fiftieth.” Exactly 50 days after Jesus rose from the dead, the Holy Spirit came upon the disciples in the form of flames of fire.

Reformation Day

On Oct. 31, 1517, Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses — the “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences” — to the church door in a small city called Wittenberg, Germany. This ignited the Protestant Reformation, and thus the church officially commemorates this important anniversary on Oct. 31.

First Sunday in Advent

The season of Advent focuses on the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, and this first Sunday establishes this theme for the rest of the season.

Second Sunday in Advent

Advent, a season of repentance, waiting and watching, looks forward in hope. Our Christian faith rests on the hope that Christ, who came in the flesh in history to accomplish our salvation, will also return in the same way to be our judge on the last day and bring us into eternal life.

Third Sunday in Advent

Advent, a season of repentance, waiting and watching, looks forward in hope. Our Christian faith rests on the hope that Christ, who came in the flesh in history to accomplish our salvation, will also return in the same way to be our judge on the last day and bring us into eternal life.

Fourth Sunday in Advent

The Fourth Sunday in Advent turns our attention toward the nativity of our Lord. With Mary, we await the coming of the Christ, her Son, conceived in her womb by the Spirit of God.